Category Archives: Media

A Father’s Amazing Love

No words. Just watch

Jimmy Valvano 1993 ESPY Speech

  • There are 3 things you should do every day – laugh, think and have emotions moved to tears. 
  • You have to remember where you came from, where you are and where you’re going
  • Cancer can take away all my physical abilities, but it cannot touch my heart, it cannot touch my mind and it cannot touch my soul

Like Water by David Foster Wallace

Summary

  1. David Foster Wallace’s 2005 commencement speech to Kenyon College is moving and inspirational but more importantly, real. He posits that we must actively fight our “natural default setting” where we are at the center of everything and that the true value of a good education is “learning how to exercise some control over how and what you think.”
Key Takeaways
  1. “…the really significant education in thinking that we’re supposed to get in a place like this isn’t really about the capacity to think, but rather about the choice of what to think about.”
  2. “It’s a matter of my choosing to do the work of somehow altering or getting free of my natural, hard-wired default setting which is to be deeply and literally self-centered and to see and interpret everything through this lens of self.:
  3. “Twenty years after my own graduation, I have come gradually to understand that the liberal arts cliché about teaching you how to think is actually shorthand for a much deeper, more serious idea: learning how to think really means learning how to exercise some control over how and what you think. It means being conscious and aware enough to choose what you pay attention to and to choose how you construct meaning from experience”
  4. “But the insidious thing about these forms of worship is not that they’re evil or sinful, it’s that they’re unconscious. They are default settings.”
  5. “The really important kind of freedom involves attention and awareness and discipline, and being able truly to care about other people and to sacrifice for them over and over in myriad petty, unsexy ways every day. That is real freedom. That is being educated, and understanding how to think. The alternative is unconsciousness, the default setting, the rat race, the constant gnawing sense of having had, and lost, some infinite thing.”
  6. “The capital-T Truth is about life BEFORE death. It is about the real value of a real education, which has almost nothing to do with knowledge, and everything to do with simple awareness; awareness of what is so real and essential, so hidden in plain sight all around us, all the time…It is unimaginably hard to do this, to stay conscious and alive in the adult world day in and day out. Which means yet another grand cliché turns out to be true: your education really IS the job of a lifetime. And it commences: now.”
What I got out of it
  1. Such a great speech and having the ability and being aware of your “default setting” and what you think about is crucial for your happiness and sanity.

Written text found here

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University of Texas 2014 Commencement Speech by Admiral William H. McRaven

Awesome speech. Enough said

“Know that life is not fair and that you will fail often, but if take you take some risks, step up when the times are toughest, face down the bullies, lift up the downtrodden and never, ever give up–if you do these things, then next generation and the generations that follow will live in a world far better than the one we have today and— what started here will indeed have changed the world—for the better.”

Full text found here.

Ryne Sandberg MLB Hall of Fame Speech

I can’t say I’m a die hard baseball fan but this speech speaks loudly on its own. Having respect for whatever you do is vital and Ryne Sandberg personifies this trait.

Key Takeaways

  1. I know that if I ever allowed myself to think this was possible, if I had ever taken one day of pro ball for granted, I’m sure I would not be here today.
  2. The reason I am here, they tell me, is that I played the game a certain way. That I played the game it was supposed to be played. I don’t know about that. But I do know this, I had too much respect for the game to play it any other way. And if there is a single reason I am here today it is because of one word, respect….Respect the game above all else. I was in awe every time I walked onto the field. That’s respect…The name on the front is much more important than the name of the back. That’s respect.
  3. My managers like Don Zimmer and Jim Frey, they always said I made things easy on them by showing up on time, never getting into trouble, being ready to play every day, leading by example, being unselfish. I made things easy on them? These things they talk about — playing every day? That was my job. I had too much respect for them and for the game to let them down. I was afraid to let them down. I didn’t want to let them down or let the fans down or my teammates or my family or myself. I had too much respect for them to let them down.
  4. A lot of people say this honor validates my career, but I didn’t work hard for validation. I didn’t play the game right because I saw a reward at the end of the tunnel. I played it right because that’s what you’re supposed to do — play it right and with respect.
  5. I dreamed of this as a child but I had too much respect for baseball to think this was ever possible. I believe it is because I had so much respect for the game and respect for getting the most out of my ability that I stand here today. I hope others in the future will know this feeling for the same reason: Respect for the game of baseball. When we all played it, it was mandatory. It’s something I hope we will one day see again.

Full text found here

No Ordinary Genius – Richard Feynman

Feynman internalized some of the most complex topics known to man and was unique in that he thought and was able to communicate these topics in simple ways. He deeply understood these topics and because they were so ingrained in him, he was able to apply them in ways that nobody else could have. A very interesting documentary of a very interesting man.