Category Archives: Books

Hard Landing: The Epic Contest for Power and Profits That Plunged the Airlines into Chaos by Thomas Petzinger

Summary

  1. This book is about the men who try to earn a profit from the tightrope act…Airlines are managed as information systems and operated as networks. They embody, and can help us understand, some of the vexing paradoxes of modern economic life—why the value pricing revolution has given consumers unparalleled economic power, for instance, while at the same time causing the living standards of so many to decline. The airlines also provide vivid case studies in corporate strategy. The terrific sums of capital at stake and the numbing repetitiveness of their operations make airlines uniquely sensitive to the commands of management. Even a question of substituting chicken Parmesan for chicken divan becomes a vital corporate matter—to say nothing of deciding to which continents an airline should fly, what fares it should charge, how many jets it should buy, or whether it should assent to the demands of a union or instead allow employees to go on strike. The thinness of the industry’s margin of error is evident in how many names have vanished from the roster

Key Takeaways

  1. The men who run the airlines of America are an extreme type; calling them men of ego would be like calling Mount McKinley a rise in the landscape. Airlines demand a single strategic vision, lest the delicate choreography of airplanes, people, timetables, and finance break down. The airlines both attract and promote executives obsessed with control, who flourish at the center of all decision making.
  2. A timber magnate in Seattle named William E. Boeing, bidding low because he built his own airplanes, won the line from Chicago to San Francisco, giving birth to what would become United Airlines.
  3. Trippe had discovered what might be called the First Rule of Airline Economics: If a plane is going to take off anyway—once the fuel is purchased and the pilot paid and the interest rendered on the money borrowed to buy the plane in the first place—any paying passenger or payload recruited to the flight is almost pure profit. The fare paid by the last passenger taken on board represents a fabulously lucrative rate of return.
  4. Increasing passenger traffic, Brown reasoned, was the one sure way to wean the airlines from postal subsidies. But public confidence could be inspired only by big, financially secure carriers committed to safety, maintenance, and training, not by the fly-by-night operators abounding at the time. Brown changed the rules so that the airlines received payments based not on the weight they carried, but on the distance they flew and the volume of space they maintained in reserve for the mail. This system guaranteed the airlines a minimum payment every time a mail plane left the ground, and the bigger the plane, the greater the payment. Though an outright gift to the airlines, Brown’s scheme gave them the incentive to order the sturdier and more costly planes then in development—planes, he hoped, that would help convince a wary public that it was at last safe to fly. Brown had codified the First Rule of Airline Economics into government policy: Once the flight was paid for, any additional payload was pure gravy.
  5. Some of them went to management with an extraordinary proposal: to maintain the existing four-airplane schedule with only three airplanes. The company was incredulous. The only way to accomplish that would be to get the planes in the air after they’d been on the ground only 10 minutes—an unheard-of feat. Fine, some of the employees said. We’ll turn them around in 10 minutes. Pilots and management supervisors were soon helping with baggage. Tickets were collected on board rather than at the gate…Each airplane was restocked with beer, booze, and soft drinks through the rear door while passengers were still deplaning through the front. Flight attendants worked their way to the front of the cabin as passengers exited the planes, picking up newspapers and crossing seat belts row by row, rather than waiting for ground handlers to come aboard. Once the last passenger had deplaned, the remaining flight attendants began performing the same tasks from front to back. “When they meet, they have time to brush their hair,” a trade publication, Aviation Week & Space Technology, would incredulously report. And as the next cargo of passengers came aboard, they did so with no seat assignments, which meant that people simply stepped into one seat and then the next and then the next, in a nice, orderly, rapid sequence. Everyone’s job had been saved. Braniff and Texas International watched in horror as Southwest gave birth to the airline industry’s first 10-minute turnaround.
  6. Southwest had discovered another lesson in airline marketing: giving the expense-account customer something for free that he could take home instead of to the office—in short, a kickback—won his undying loyalty.
  7. Surveys showed that 25 percent of the people flying on “peanuts fares” would have otherwise made their trip in a car; an additional 30 percent otherwise would have stayed home. Some of these new, first-time fliers began to think about doing it a second time, and a third.
  8. On the rare occasions that United got the better of American, Crandall blew his stack and demanded immediate countermeasures. At one point United obtained an exclusive software license from a Florida company for a series of bookkeeping and other programs that could be made available to travel agents over the Apollo network. Crandall ordered his people to jump on the next flight to Florida, where they arranged to buy the very company that had sold the software license to United. American gained the benefit not only of owning the technology but of employing all the people who had developed it. Sabre was not only a way of making fees, of course, but also a distribution system for American’s own flights. Although agents could book flights on nearly any airline through Sabre, Crandall began enticing agents to skew their bookings toward American with an addictive new financial arrangement. The greater the dollar value of an agency’s business with American, the greater the percentage the agency received on the entire sum. The standard 5 percent commission might be increased to 6 percent, say, on ticket sales over $1 million, or 7 percent on sales over $3 million. (American could easily pay the higher rate, since each additional passenger put so much money on the bottom line.) The more American flights an agency booked through Sabre, the greater its incentive to buy still more flights on American.
  9. “We are a highly financially successful airline, and the focus of the entire airline industry, the public, and the legislators in Washington,” the presentation read. “Maximization of the financial (e.g., cost cutting, marketing, peanuts fares, debt structure, etc.) was historically correct and absolutely essential for this company’s survival at one time in our history. “But when low fares become universal,” the report went on, “we will be left in large part with the ‘people’ equation as the chief component of competitive leverage.” Success and failure in the airline business, the report said, would be decided on customer service.
  10. Lorenzo also borrowed from the underdog strategy that Herb Kelleher of Southwest Airlines had used against him, showing up at hearings and local community meetings with only one or two executives in tow, in contrast to the platoon that Pan Am always dispatched.
  11. The permutations increase arithmetically according to the number of aircraft and geometrically according to the number of aircraft types in any given fleet—another of the reverse economies of scale that plague airlines as they grow.
  12. They would walk into the meeting with knots in their stomachs, for it was an unforgivable sin at American Airlines to appear in a meeting before Bob Crandall without having every fact at one’s command. He would cut you to ribbons.
  13. Braniff’s powerful hub vividly demonstrated another inviolate rule of the airline business: Whoever has the most flights from a city gets a disproportionate share of the passengers. Frequency enhanced convenience—the convenience of flying the day of your meeting, not the night before; the convenience of arriving just an hour before your business was scheduled to begin.
  14. Meanwhile the endless computer studies at American had turned up another fascinating fact. Although American carried 25 million passengers a year, something like 40 percent of its business came from about 5 percent of its customers. There were that many repeat customers—“frequent fliers,” one might call them. Any incremental customer was welcome, of course, but every incremental frequent flier was, on average, nearly 10 times more valuable.
  15. That was it. American could have its customers accumulate mileage instead of Green Stamps, earning free travel instead of household appliances. The concept was not unheard-of among the airlines. Southwest Airlines already had a program in which secretaries got free travel after booking so many trips for their bosses.
  16. The element of surprise was critical. Other major airlines would have no choice but to match the program, but it would take them months to catch up, months in which American would have the entire field to itself. By having all the necessary Sabre programming written and debugged in advance, American would allow passengers to start accumulating mileage on the very day that it announced the program.
  17. Other airlines, ordering whatever happened to be the new or sexy or cool plane of the moment, invariably wound up with many species of aircraft in their fleets. Southwest, by contrast, flew only 737s, requiring it to stockpile parts and train pilots and mechanics for only one kind of plane. The efficiencies were huge. Now, instead of rushing out to buy something altogether new, Southwest persuaded Boeing simply to update the old reliable 737.
  18. Thus, as air cascades along the bottom of a wing, it is also being sucked, as if from a vacuum cleaner, toward the top of the wing. The faster the wing travels laterally, the greater the pressure differential above and below. The greater the differential, the greater the lift generated. Safety lay in speed.
    1. Velocity
  19. In its studies of the failed Continental strike ALPA had also discovered the critical role that wives played in the decisions of their husbands in crossing picket lines.
    1. Lateral Networks
  20. In Dallas Bob Crandall was jealous and outraged to learn that United was buying the Pacific division of Pan Am—and that he had never been given the opportunity to bid on it. Crandall could not imagine why he had been entirely cut out. In fact Acker and Gitner had considered shopping the routes to Crandall, whose interest in establishing foreign routes was well known. But Pan Am had previously conducted a major airplane swap with American, and they had found Crandall prickly and impossible to satisfy. The Pacific sale was an emergency transaction. A strike had been raging and cash dwindling. There was no time for dealing with a difficult personality. No one ever told Crandall that he was denied the chance to make the airline deal of the decade because he was just too tough.
  21. The whole airline industry had become a living expression of the S-curve of yore: he who has the most planes gets more than his proportion of the passengers.
  22. Just as Burr and his associates had made a virtue of the simplicity of peanuts fares back at Texas International, so too did People Express promote the simplicity of its fare structure; one series of ads showed a reservationist for the fictitious “BS Airlines” double-talking through a series of ludicrously complex restrictions. Even where the major airlines bravely matched People Express dollar for dollar, Burr still benefited because the low fares brought so many passengers into the market that all airlines benefited.
  23. To make a reservation someone—a passenger or a travel agent—had to phone People Express directly, which proved a maddening experience; the relentless busy signal at People Express accounted for the first acquaintance of many people with the redial button on their telephones. By 1984 some 6,000 potential passengers a day failed to connect by phone. Burr also suffered uniquely from the age-old problem of overbooking. People Express permitted customers to buy their tickets after they had boarded the airplane, giving no passenger the slightest incentive to honor a reservation, much less to cancel one after his or her plans had changed. No-shows were so numerous that People Express began overselling some flights by 100 percent. Often, of course, many of the expected no-shows actually materialized, leaving dozens of unhappy people with confirmed reservations stuck in the pandemonium of the North Terminal.
  24. Any incremental passenger is worthwhile, at virtually any price.
  25. In the unwritten rules of the post-deregulation era, three major airlines operating within a single hub city was at least one too many. As American had displayed in Dallas, operating a hub had become a contest to control the maximum number of passengers between the maximum number of city pairs. This strategy demanded a huge number of airplanes flying hundreds of hub landings and departures every day, like a hive of worker bees racing to and from their queen. It was only marginally economical for two big carriers to conduct service on this scale at a hub; where three airlines attempted to do so, planes flew empty, which meant that fares plunged, which meant that no one made any money on anything.
  26. Don Burr did not realize that he was whistling “Dixie.” The majors were not, as a matter of fact, using their transcontinental routes to subsidize their short-haul routes—at least not enough to account for their 70 percent discounts. The majors were offering low fares against People Express because they had computers that enabled them to offer rock-bottom prices to discretionary passengers and still keep as many seats as necessary in store for higher-paying passengers. That was the cross-subsidy that was killing People Express.
  27. As he had planned, Burr grafted the systems and culture of People Express onto Frontier; the disaster was monumental. Frontier had always been considered a classy airline, and the years of warfare with United and Continental had only brought out the best in service at all three. Now longtime Frontier passengers were being charged 50¢ for a cup of coffee. To stuff more seats into Frontier’s airplanes, Burr took out the galleys and began serving cold meals—three bucks for crackers, cheese, maybe some sausage. “Kibbles’N Bits,” people called it.
  28. The computer technology that wiped out People Express in the marketplace did for flying what the assembly line did for the automobile. It reduced it to the most common denominator.
  29. Inside the airline industry, however, everyone knew Southwest and only too well. It had never lost money, from the time it was fully established in business. And it had flourished while defying almost every success maxim of the post-deregulation world: it had no computer reservations system, offered no frequent-flier program, did not conduct yield management, and had never organized its flight schedules around anything remotely approaching a hub. How did Southwest do it? Consultants and academics were forever crawling over the company, looking for an answer as if they were searching for the recipe for Coke. Through all the studies no one ever had a better explanation than Robert Baker, who as Bob Crandall’s principal operating aide at American had come to know Southwest well. “That place,” Baker would say, “runs on Herb Kelleher’s bullshit.”
  30. Within a year of offering service Southwest often doubled the ridership of whatever circuitous or direct service existed previously and doubled it again within the second year. It was unique among the airlines not only because it flew point to point instead of through hubs, but also because it built its markets almost entirely through a direct appeal to the public, bypassing travel agents. Southwest was happy to let other airlines fight for the loyalties of travel agents; doing so had pushed the commissions paid to travel agents to 10 percent of the ticket price, up from 5 percent in the regulated era. Southwest in fact did not particularly need travel agents. There were rarely any complicated itineraries involved in flying Southwest; the trip was usually just there and back, often in the same day. Southwest’s fares were excruciatingly simple, generally just two prices (peak and off-peak) on any route. Travel agents, for their part, were only too happy to let passengers handle their own reservations on Southwest; at such low fares the commissions were hardly worth it, especially since for the most part travel agents had to book reservations on Southwest by phone. Southwest refused to pay transaction fees to the major computer reservation systems.
  31. Kelleher perpetuated the company’s underdog spirit. He had never fully recovered from the legal battle to get Southwest aloft and the trauma of its harrowing shoestring days, and neither had the earliest generation of employees. Maintaining the culture of martyrdom became so essential a strategy that it overpowered other corporate objectives; Southwest added cities and airplanes much more slowly than it could afford to, for instance, in large part to avoid an influx of new employees, which might dilute the purity of the “Southwest spirit.”
  32. Kelleher also took the risky step of actively fostering “fun” in the workplace—risky because employees can easily spot a fake when such efforts are structured to manipulate or offered as a substitute for pay or perquisites. Kelleher’s intentions were indisputably commercial: happy employees are not only more productive but less apt to brood over setbacks and frustrations. More important, an ambiance of cheer—at the ticket counter, on the telephone, in the passenger cabin—was a critical component of Southwest’s no-frills marketing formula.
  33. The passenger was deemed paramount; every employee’s paycheck bore the words, “From our customers.”
  34. At least two factors at Southwest rescued this culture from cynicism. For one, Southwest had always encouraged spontaneous acts of frolic, such as a flight attendant’s conducting the preflight safety demonstrations to the tune of the William Tell Overture or the theme from The Beverly Hillbillies, or trying to see how many passengers would fit in a lavatory, or conducting a contest to see which passenger had the biggest hole in his sock. Instead of homogenizing the product (as no one did better than American, for instance), Southwest rewarded departures from the standard. Southwest also succeeded in nurturing fun because Kelleher cast himself as the chief jester—and made himself the butt of the most jokes. No personal appearance was too demeaning, no crack too crass.
  35. As for Kelleher’s own office, the architect had received specific instructions: no windows. Once word had spread that he had a windowless office, Kelleher explained, how could anyone dare jockey for an office with a better view? To further control new-office politics, his executive assistant, Colleen Barrett, now a corporate officer, banned department heads from the committee planning the move; underlings, she and Herb reasoned, would be less absorbed in issues of office size and more committed to the merits of any space issue.
  36. Kelleher was a hero-worshiper and a reader of history and literature who could reel off couplets from Wordsworth, aphorisms from Clausewitz, and exchanges from Nixon’s 1950 debates with Helen Gahagan Douglas.
  37. This is where Southwest came in. While the major airlines were frantically working to become all things to everyone, Southwest recognized that a huge number of people in any city would rarely want to fly anywhere except to a few other cities.
  38. That Southwest operated largely in a market all its own was most evident in its headquarters town of Dallas. Southwest shared its operating center with the fastest growing and most ruthlessly powerful airline in the world, American Airlines. Yet even as both airlines grew, even as the airline industry became more competitive year by year, American and Southwest served increasingly divergent markets from their respective airports and actually became less competitive as time passed.
  39. One evening Kelleher was talking to a business executive at a cocktail reception in Dallas. “I see that American now has fares as low as yours,” the man said. “Yes,” Kelleher admitted. But American, he patiently explained, required passengers to buy a ticket 30 days in advance. By contrast, Kelleher said cheerfully, anyone could walk right up to the airport gate and fly at those prices on Southwest.
  40. But Southwest quickly realized that by exposing itself to even the rudiments of yield management, it could take its low fares so much lower that they practically disappeared—while the flights themselves remained profitable. Suddenly a passenger could fly anywhere on Southwest Airlines for $19. After American had beaten People Express at its game, Southwest was beating American at its.
  41. Kelleher did harbor a flaw, however, one that was so obvious no one could appreciate it. He had made Southwest Airlines a one-man show.
  42. Lorenzo had not foreseen the worst problem of all: scheduling the newly swollen and far-flung workforce. As with so much else in airlines, crew scheduling creates a reverse economy of scale: the bigger the operation, the more difficult, costly, and inefficient it becomes. Pilots and flight attendants, calling in for new assignments as flight cancellations worsened, encountered busy signals, meaning they could not be reassigned, causing still more flights to be canceled. There’s no such thing as a half-broken airline.
  43. In the brief time he had served as the president of Continental Airlines, Tom Plaskett learned that aircraft suppliers made a point of keeping a little something in reserve in any negotiation with Lorenzo, even past the point of the handshakes, because Lorenzo would try to re-trade the deal. They called it the “Frank factor.” Phil Bakes would call this phenomenon the “last nickel” impulse.
  44. Bob Crandall rapidly filled the void left by Eastern in Miami. Before long American would control 85 percent of the airline seats going in and out of the vital gateway. Having so many seats at a single airport, as he once explained to a meeting of his pilots, gave Crandall control not only over the local aviation market but over the community’s travel agents as well.
  45. The self-destruction of Continental Airlines vividly revealed a principle as old as passenger flight itself: people will tolerate many sacrifices to fly, but they will not tolerate surprise. Predictability—the fulfillment of expectations—is the most important factor in whether an airplane flight is a pleasantly efficient experience or one of modern life’s worst travails. This principle is doubly important on international flights.
  46. Like bees, airlines pollinate the world’s financial system with capital. They create, mobilize, and transport wealth in proportions vastly exceeding the fares paid by the passengers.
  47. For a boy who grew up poor, Wolf acclimated himself easily to the badges of fortune.
  48. Crandall, for all his ruthlessness as a taskmaster, was perhaps the best boss in the airline industry for female executives; a number had attained top positions in Crandall’s organization. If Crandall harbored any of the sexist bias so prevalent in the airline industry, it was snuffed out by his obsession with performance.
  49. The company was now losing something like $2 million a day. Pan Am’s personnel analysts observed a sudden, sharp increase in medical claims, apparently as employees hurried up elective medical attention on the expectation that their benefits might soon vanish.
  50. But Delta delivered for its employees. Delta people got jobs for life; the company had not laid off a soul in 34 years. There had been no BOHICA, no concessions, no b-scales. Delta paid its people exceptionally well, not only by the standards of the low-wage southern United States but by airline industry standards as well. On the initiative of the flight attendants, Delta’s employees had once organized the purchase of a Boeing 767—a $30 million airplane—from their own paychecks. It was only such a corporate environment that could produce an airline chief executive officer from the ranks of the personnel department. Ron Allen—like all his predecessors in the chairman’s suite, a born-and-bred Delta product
  51. Freddie Laker had been out of business nearly two years when an American lawyer living in London came to Branson in 1984 with a plan to resurrect Laker’s operating authority between Gatwick and Newark. Branson quickly bought the idea, sticking the Virgin logo on it. The two days he had spent trying to get through on the telephone to People Express was the entirety of his market research. The failure of anyone to answer the phone told him that either there remained either unrequited demand for cheap flights over the Atlantic or the service being provided was incompetent. Either way there was an opening

What I got out of it

  1. An incredibly captivating and fun deep dive into the foundations and evolution of the airline industry with a lot of narrative lessons about business model, strategy, incentives, psychology, and more

On Dialogue by David Bohm

Summary

  1. Bohm believed that the alternative way toward understanding a whole arises through participation rather than abstraction. “A different kind of consciousness is possible among us, a participatory consciousness.” In a genuine dialogue, “each person is participating, is partaking of the whole meaning of the group and also taking part in it.” This is not necessarily pleasant, as Bohm warns.

Key Takeaways

  1. This odd phrase, “take part in truth,” points to, what seems to me, Bohm’s second foundational idea: what it means to understand wholes.     
  2. In the dialogue, a very considerable degree of attention is required to keep track of the subtle implications of one’s own assumptive/reactive tendencies, while also sensing similar patterns in the group as a whole. Bohm emphasized that such attention, or awareness, is not a matter of accumulated knowledge or technique, nor does it have the goal of “correcting” what may emerge in the dialogue. Rather, it is more of the nature of relaxed, nonjudgmental curiosity, its primary activity being to see things as freshly and clearly as possible. The nurturing of such attention, often bypassed in more utilitarian versions of dialogue, is a central element in Bohm’s approach to the process.
  3. two further aspects of dialogue – the notion of shared meaning within a group, and the absence of a preestablished purpose or agenda.
  4. This definition provides a foundation, a reference point if you will, for the key components of dialogue: shared meaning; the nature of collective thought; the pervasiveness of fragmentation; the function of awareness; the microcultural context; undirected inquiry; impersonal fellowship; and the paradox of the observer and the observed.
  5. What is suggested is not that we attempt to alter the process of representation (which may be impossible), but that we carefully attend to the fact that any given representation – instinctively perceived as “reality” – may be somewhat less than real, or true. From such a perspective we may be able to engage a quality of reflective intelligence – a kind of discernment that enables us to perceive and dispense with fundamentally false representations, and become more exacting in the formation of new ones.
  6. Bohm suggests that while literal thought has been predominant since the inception of civilization, a more archaic form of perception, formed over the whole of human evolution, remains latent – and at times active – in the structure of our consciousness. This he refers to as “participatory thought,” a mode of thought in which discrete boundaries are sensed as permeable, objects have an underlying relationship with one another, and the movement of the perceptible world is sensed as participating in some vital essence.
  7. Thus, in a dialogue, each person does not attempt to make common certain ideas or items of information that are already known to him. Rather, it may be said that the two people are making something in common, i.e., creating something new together. But of course such communication can lead to the creation of something new only if people are able freely to listen to each other, without prejudice, and without trying to influence each other. Each has to be interested primarily in truth and coherence, so that he is ready to drop his old ideas and intentions, and be ready to go on to something different, when this is called for.
  8. Evidently then, what is crucial is to be aware of the nature of one’s own “blocks.” If one is alert and attentive, he can see for example that whenever certain questions arise, there are fleeting sensations of fear, which push him away from consideration of these questions, and of pleasure, which attract his thoughts and cause them to be occupied with other questions.
  9. The way we start a dialogue group is usually by talking about dialogue – talking it over, discussing why we’re doing it, what it means, and so forth.
  10. The picture or image that this derivation suggests is of a stream of meaning flowing among and through us and between us. This will make possible a flow of meaning in the whole group, out of which may emerge some new understanding.
  11. In a dialogue, everybody wins.
  12. A basic notion for a dialogue would be for people to sit in a circle. Such a geometric arrangement doesn’t favor anybody; it allows for direct communication. In principle, the dialogue should work without any leader and without any agenda.
  13. Our purpose is really to communicate coherently in truth, if you want to call that a purpose.
  14. In fact, the problems we have been discussing are basically all due to this lack of proprioception. The point of suspension is to help make proprioception possible, to create a mirror so that you can see the results of your thought.
  15. Sometimes people feel a sense of dialogue within their families. But a family is generally a hierarchy, organized on the principle of authority which is contrary to dialogue.
  16. Dialogue is the collective way of opening up judgments and assumptions.
  17. Practically all of what has been called nature has been arranged by thought. Yet thought also goes wrong somehow, and produces destruction. This arises from a certain way of thinking, i.e., fragmentation. This is to break things up into bits, as if they were independent. It’s not merely making divisions, but it is breaking things up which are not really separate. It’s like taking a watch and smashing it into fragments, rather than taking it apart and finding its parts. The parts are parts of a whole, but the fragments are just arbitrarily broken off from each other. Things which really fit, and belong together, are treated as if they do not. That’s one of the features of thought that’s going wrong.
  18. But the assumptions affect the way we see things, the way we experience them, and, consequently, the things that we want to do. In a way, we are looking through our assumptions; the assumptions could be said to be an observer in a sense.
  19. Thought lacks proprioception, and we have got to learn, somehow, to observe thought. In the case of observing the body, you can tell that observation is somehow taking place – even when there is no sense of a distinct observer. Is it possible for thought similarly to observe itself, to see what it is doing, perhaps by awakening some other sense of what thought is, possibly through attention? In that way, thought may become proprioceptive. It will know what it is doing and it will not create a mess. If I didn’t know what I was doing when I made an outward physical action, everything would go wrong. And clearly, when thought doesn’t know what it is doing, then such a mess arises. So let us look further – first at suspension, then at proprioception.
  20. What is called for is not suppressing the awareness of anger, nor suppressing nor carrying out its manifestations, but rather, suspending them in the middle at sort of an unstable point – as on a knife-edge – so that you can look at the whole process. That is what is called for.
  21. The word leisure has a root meaning “emptiness” – an empty space of some sort – an empty space of time or place, where there is nothing occupying you. You might begin by looking at nature, where there are minimal distractions.

What I got out of it

  1. Two key elements of dialogue – shared meaning within a group, and the absence of a preestablished purpose or agenda. True co-creation without prejudice, a process to try to see our true assumptions and work our way towards truth

Becoming Trader Joe:  How I Did Business My Way and Still Beat the Big Guys by Joe Coulombe

Summary

  1. Joe Coulombe shares how Trader Joe’s came to be and some of his core operating principles.

Key Takeaways

  1. His first rule for new ideas was to always think outside the box, but always consider our customers and employees.
  2. I began the transition of Pronto into Trader Joe’s. I resigned at the end of 1988. During those twenty-six years, our sales grew at a compound rate of 19 percent per year. During the same twenty-six years, our net worth grew at a compound rate of 26 percent per year. Furthermore, during the last thirteen years of that period, we had no fixed, interest-bearing debt, only current liabilities. We went from leveraged to the gills in the early days to zero leverage by 1975. Furthermore, we never lost money in a year, and each year was more profitable than the preceding year despite wild swings in income tax rates.
  3. In June 1982, my wife, Alice, and I went to Lima to visit the canning plant. We witnessed something very interesting: the United States had a quota for imported tuna. Once Peru’s quota had been filled, a biological miracle occurred right there on the canning line. What had been tuna was now pilchard, a member of the herring family, on which there was no quota. The like hasn’t been seen since the Sea of Galilee! To this day, Trader Joe’s is virtually the only retailer of pilchard.
  4. technology for grinding almonds is completely different than the technology for grinding peanuts. Finally, Doug, whom you will meet often in these pages, found a religious colony in Oregon who had mastered the trick and taught it to Doug.
  5. If all the facts could be known, idiots could make the decisions. —Tex Thornton, cofounder of Litton Industries, quoted in the Los Angeles Times in the mid-1960s. This is my favorite of all managerial quotes.
  6. In 1962, Barbara Tuchman published The Guns of August, an account of the first ninety days of World War I. It’s the best book on management—and, especially, mismanagement—I’ve ever read. The most basic conclusion I drew from her book was that, if you adopt a reasonable strategy, as opposed to waiting for an optimum strategy, and stick with it, you’ll probably succeed. Tenacity is as important as brilliance.
  7. . . non-convex problems . . . are puzzles in which there may be several good but not ideal answers which classical search techniques may wrongly identify as the best one. I concluded that I didn’t have to find an optimum solution to Pronto’s difficulties, just a reasonable one. Trying to find an optimum solution in business is a waste of time: the factors in the equation are changing all the time.
  8. This is the most important single business decision I ever made: to pay people well. Time and again I am asked why no one has successfully replicated Trader Joe’s. The answer is that no one has been willing to pay the wages and benefits, and thereby attract—and keep—the quality of people who work at Trader Joe’s. My standard was simple: the average full-time employee in the stores would make the median family income for California. Back in those days it was about $7,000; as I write this, it is around $40,000. What I didn’t count on back there in the 1960s was that so many spouses would go to work in the national economy. When I started, average family income was about the same as average employee income. The great social change of the 1970s and 1980s moved millions of women into the workplace. Average family income soared ahead. But we stuck with our standard, and it paid off.
  9. We really didn’t pay more per hour than union scale, but we gave people hours. Because union scale is so high, the supermarkets are very stingy with hours and will do anything to avoid paying overtime. I simply built overtime into the system: everyone was to work a five day, forty-eight-hour week. Actually, because of fluctuations in the business, employees often alternate between four-day and six-day weeks (38.5 hours to 57.5 hours). This generates a lot of three-day weekends, which is quite popular with the troops.
  10. Equally important was our practice of giving every full-time employee an interview every six months. At Stanford I’d been taught that employees never organize because of money: they organize because of un-listened-to grievances. We set up a program under which each employee (including some part-timers) was interviewed, not by the immediate superior, the store manager, but by the manager’s superior. The principal purpose of this program was to vent grievances and address them where possible. And I think this program was as important as pay in keeping employees with us.
  11. In a lecture at the University of Southern California Business School, I talked about this. A young woman raised her hand: “But how could you afford to pay so much more than your competition?” The answer, of course, is that good people pay by their extra productivity. You can’t afford to have cheap employees.
  12. Early in my career I learned there are two kinds of decisions: the ones that are easily reversible and the ones that aren’t. Fifteen-year leases are the least-reversible decisions you can make. That’s why, throughout my career, I kept absolute control of real estate decisions
  13. To this day, the promotion of Extra Large AA eggs is one of the foundations of Trader Joe’s merchandising, not just because of the program per se, but because it set me to wondering whether there weren’t other discontinuities out there in the supplies of merchandise. Eight years later, we built Trader Joe’s on the principle of discontinuity.
  14. As we evolved Trader Joe’s, its greatest departure from the norm wasn’t its size or its decor. It was our commitment to product knowledge, something which was totally foreign to the mass-merchant culture, and our turning our backs to branded merchandise.
  15. Still trying to maximize the use of a small store, I looked for other categories that met the Four Tests: high value per cubic inch, high rate of consumption; easily handled; and something in which we could be outstanding in terms of price or assortment.
  16. I took a cue from General Patton, who thought that the greatest danger was not that the enemy would learn his plans, but that his own troops would not.
  17. I admire Nordstrom’s fundamental instruction to its employees: use your best judgment.
  18. We became the best place in the world to buy a good bottle of wine for less than $2.00. That’s a position we held for the rest of my days at Trader Joe’s. It absolutely addressed our prime market, the overeducated and underpaid people of California.
  19. Leroy found a hippie outfit in Venice—I think it was called Mom’s Trucking—which would package the bran. But bran is a low-value product. They couldn’t afford to deliver it. Since they also packaged nuts and dried fruits, however, we somewhat reluctantly added them to the order. And that’s how Trader Joe’s became the largest retailer of nuts and dried fruits in California! Brilliant foresight! Astute market analysis!
  20. Growth for the sake of growth still troubles me. It seems unnatural, even perverted.
  21. One of the fundamental tenets of Trader Joe’s is that its retail prices don’t change unless its costs change. There are no weekend ad prices, no in-and-out pricing.
  22. One should never use a mandatory sentence in addressing a customer; should never give orders. The subliminal message of a Trader Joe’s commercial is, “We’re gonna be around for a long time. If you miss out on this bargain, there’ll be another. If you have the time and inclination .
  23. My point is that a businessperson who complains about problems doesn’t understand where his bread is coming from. So by hairballs I don’t mean those fundamental issues such as demand, supply, competition, labor, capital, etc., which create the matrix of a business. By hairballs, I mean those wholly unnecessary thorns that come unexpectedly. Their greatest danger is that they consume management stamina that is needed to deal with the Matrix Issues.
  24. We fundamentally changed the point of view of the business from customer-oriented to buyer-oriented. I put our buyers in charge of the company.
  25. Each SKU would stand on its own two feet as a profit center. We would earn a gross profit on each SKU that was justified by the cost of handling that item. There would be no “loss leaders.”
  26. Above all we would not carry any item unless we could be outstanding in terms of price (and make a profit at that price) or uniqueness.
  27. Yet it cuts a wide swath in food retailing thanks to Intensive Buying, which is what the 1977 Five Year Plan boiled down to, which I formally named by the end of that plan, and which stressed mobility, irregularity, and adaptability.
  28. Honor Thy Vendors – Many of our best product ideas and special buying opportunities came from our vendors.
  29. Vendors should get prompt decisions. Some of our greatest coups were generated by our commitment to make an offer within twenty-four hours of a presentation.
  30. Vendors should be regarded as extensions of the retailer, a Marks & Spencer concept. Their employees should be regarded almost as employees of the retailer. Concern for their welfare should be shown, because employee turnover at vendors sometimes can be more costly than turnover of your own employees.
  31. adopted a rule: Screw me once, shame on you. Screw me twice, shame on me. The vendor who screwed us twice was through, forever. During all my years in the company, I can recall only a couple of instances of permanent banishment. One thing that never failed to astonish me was how well samples from vendors actually matched the delivered products. Most people, even vendors, act well if you treat them decently.
  32. During the next twelve years under Mac the Knife, we not only radically changed the composition of what we sold; we totally centralized the distribution into our own system, ending all direct store deliveries by vendors!
  33. People often ask me, how many stores did we have at such-and-such a time? It’s the wrong question to ask. What’s important is dollar sales. For example, from 1980 to 1988, we increased the number of stores by 50 percent, but sales were up 340 percent.
  34. But my preference is to have a few stores, as far apart as possible, and to make them as high volume as possible. With Mac the Knife we could draw people from twenty-five to fifty miles away. When we opened Ventura in 1983, 30 percent of our business came from Santa Barbara. Sales per store, sales per square foot: those are the measures I look at. Trader Joe’s sales were $1,000 per square foot of total area. The supermarket average is $570, but they use “sales area” not total area. And yes, there is a difference.
  35. I want to brag about something here: in thirty years we never had a layoff of full-time employees. Seasonal swings in business were handled with overtime pay to full-time employees, and by adjusting part-time hours. The stability of full-time employment at Trader Joe’s was due in part to caution in opening new stores, and insisting on high-volume stores.
  36. I believe in ruthlessly dumping the dogs at whatever cost. Why? Because their real cost is in management energy. You always spend more time trying to make the dogs acceptable than in raising the okay stores into winners. And it’s in the dogs that you always have the most personnel problems.
  37. I believe that the sine qua non for successful retailing is demographic coherence: all your locations should have the same demographics whether you are selling clothing or wine. We looked for our demographics: there are lots of overeducated and underpaid people in Southern California.
  38. I liked semi-decayed neighborhoods, where the census tract income statistics looked terrible, but the mortgages were all paid-down, and the kids had left home. Housing and rental prices tend to be lower, and more suitable for those underpaid academics. Related to this, I was more interested in the number of households in a given area than the number of people in a ZIP code. Trader Joe’s is not a store for kids or big families. One or two adults was just fine.
  39. Given the number of households, I would judge the degree of suitability based on my experience since 1954 in looking at California real estate, and then based on driving the area thoroughly. I would never trust a broker’s judgment. If I saw lots of campers and speedboats in the driveways, I’d ax the location. People who consume high levels of fossil fuels don’t fit the Trader Joe’s profile.
  40. The answer is to design a store that has no competition. That’s why Mac the Knife should not carry any SKU in which it is not outstanding.
  41. The bonus was based on Trader Joe’s overall profit, allocated among the stores based on each store’s contribution. Sure, we massaged the numbers to avoid perceived unfairness, but that was basically the system. In 1988, several Captains made bonuses of more than 70 percent of their base pay. And our 15.4 percent retirement accrual applied to bonuses as well as base pay! I don’t believe in bologna-slice bonuses. Unless a bonus system promises, and delivers, big rewards, it should be abandoned.
  42. We instituted full health and dental insurance back in the 1960s when it was cheap. When I left, we were paying about $6,000 per employee per year! Why? If the employees are stressed by medical bills, they may steal. That’s one good reason for Trader Joe’s generous health and dental plans. On the other hand, we were cheap, cheap, cheap on life insurance. Nobody steals because of an inadequate life insurance program.
  43. Each full-timer was supposed to be able to perform every job in the store, including checking, balancing the books, ordering each department, stocking, opening, closing, going to the bank, etc. Everybody worked the check stands in the course of a day, including the Captain.
  44. The people in the stores were long-tenured, partly because most of our full-timers had risen from the ranks of the part-timers; and partly because of the slow growth of the number of stores, so there weren’t scads of promotion opportunities.
  45. The top thirteen people were in the Central Management Bonus Pool. They voted each year how it would be divided among themselves and they usually voted to split the pool evenly, so Leroy got the same bonus as Doug Rauch or our Controller, Mary Genest. Like the Captains’ bonus pool, the bonus pool was determined by profit before taxes, and after the Captain’s bonus had been paid. It was rich, typically 40 percent of a Senior Project Director’s salary. As I recall in 1988, the typical salary and bonus came to $120,000.
  46. Drucker wrote a seminal piece in the July 25, 1989, Wall Street Journal called “Sell the Mail Room.” Every executive should take it to heart.
  47. We tried to stay out of all functions that were not central to our primary job in society: namely, buying and selling merchandise.
  48. From my view, the Demand Side of Retailers can be analyzed in terms of five variables: The assortment of merchandise offered for sale. Pricing: stability (weekend ads?), and relative to competition. Convenience: geographical, in-store, and time. Credit: the accepted methods of payment. Showmanship: the sum of all activities that result in making contact with the customer, from advertising to store architecture to employee cleanliness. Here are factors on the Supply Side: Merchandise Vendors Employees The way you do things: “habits” and “culture” Systems Non-merchandise vendors Landlords Governments Bankers and investment bankers Stockholders Crime As in double entry accounting, the change in any factor must be matched by a corresponding change in another factor.
  49. We never had “closeout” sales. What a terrible practice! You train your customers to wait for the “sale.” Any product that failed to sell was given to charity. We were developing new products all the time; sometimes they didn’t pan out. So we gave them away. I do not believe in “market testing” new products.
  50. Lighting, I think, is one of the key elements in successful retailing.
  51. For example, by the time I left Trader Joe’s, we were selling 45 percent of all the Jarlsberg cheese sold in California. Our price was $3.49. The going price in the supermarkets was $6.00. The “cost” of the supermarkets into their stores, however, was about $3.49. Why? Because the supermarkets insisted on advertising allowances, which were credited to the ad budget; cash discounts, which were credited to General Administration; promotional allowances, which were credited to revenue, etc. The apparent cost was inflated by all these accounting decisions. The fact is that most supermarkets don’t know what their true cost is for Jarlsberg because their buyers want to look good. They are incentivized by the amount of revenue and ad allowances they generate.
  52. Trader Joe’s buying objective was to get just one, dead-net price, delivered to our distribution centers. This was quite similar to the policy that Sam Walton was developing at about the same time, a practice called “contract pricing.”
  53. My cash policy was this: we would always have cash at least equal to two weeks’ sales. (I think this is called an “heuristic” decision in business school.) Any month we didn’t meet the test, I would borrow from Bank of America on a five-year term loan ostensibly secured by store fixtures. But I wasn’t borrowing for fixtures and inventory, as I took pains to explain to Bank of America. If I had enough cash to buy fixtures, I didn’t borrow. After 1975, I never borrowed again.
  54. An entire chapter, “Crime Side Retailing,” could be written because that’s how I spent half of my time: dealing with crime with before-the-fact controls, and after-the-fact with detection and action.
  55. One of the most important Supply Side constraints is the stamina of the Chief Executive Officer. I haven’t listed it above, but it’s there. And the sort of thing that wore down this CEO was year after year of employee theft.
  56. It didn’t help that Sol Price had sold FedMart the previous year to another German capitalist, a sale that ended in an explosive exit by Sol, and the subsequent collapse of FedMart.
  57. The calculus of what do I risk if I sell included the fact that Trader Joe’s was my Zen window on the world. I experienced the world mostly through Trader Joe’s. That’s an advantage of being self-employed. That window can never be as open while you’re an employee, even a Frederick-Forsyth rich one, even one given great discretion by absentee owners.
  58. This is one of the most important things I can impart: in any troubled company the people at lower levels know what ought to be done in terms of day-to-day operations.

What I got out of it

  1. A really fun, personal story of Trader Joe’s founding – truly caring about employees and customers, the power of high wages, the power of incremental improvements and always looking to bring innovative products at the cheapest prices, take a simple idea and take it seriously, principle of discontinuity, deep product knowledge, simple and consistent pricing (no games),

The Psychology of Money: Timeless Lessons on Wealth, Greed, and Happiness by Morgan Housel

Summary

  1. In finance, the soft skills (how you behave) is typically more powerful than the hard, technical skills. Finance is guided more by psychology than laws and this book will help you better understand this idea and how to counter some of the more deleterious effects that ignoring them might bring

Key Takeaways

  1. Luck and risk are inescapable – nothing is ever as good or as bad as it seems
  2. “Enough” is a powerful word and one of the most valuable financial skills is to keep the goal posts from moving.
  3. Compounding is a true superpower. A mentality of frugality, paranoia, survival is key. Don’t do anything that can wipe you out and understand that staying wealthy is a different skill than getting wealthy
  4. Honor the power of tails, 80/20
  5. Money’s greatest value is to give you control over how you spend your time
  6. Wealth is what is hidden
  7. Reasonable > Rational – having an approach which you’ll sustain and which allows you to sleep at night is better than what is mathematically optimal
  8. Think of volatility as fees rather than fines
  9. More than some dollar amount, seek independence, the ability to do what you want, when you want. Save more than you spend, keep your lifestyle spending in check, understand your priorities, and give yourself a nice margin of safety

What I got out of it

  1. An incredibly applicable, approachable, and useful book for those who want to better understand how to think about money, investing, saving, and what true wealth really means

Amp It Up: Leading for Hypergrowth by Raising Expectations, Increasing Urgency, and Elevating Intensity

Summary

  1. This book will help you accelerate your progress without expensive personnel or technological changes. It starts with raising your standards, aligning your people and culture, sharpening your focus, picking up your pace and transforming your strategy.

Key Takeaways

  1. Most good companies operate well within siloes. Great companies do that and operate incredibly well across silos
  2. A high trust environment is crucial. Admit failures, make sure you’re consistent and deliver on what you promise, focus on solutions to problems and not people
  3. No customer success teams – person and team who owns a customer needs to be responsible for their happiness. Align incentives
  4. Biz dev is for more unusual customer contacts. Sales is for highly repeatable sales processes. Over invest in lead gen before you invest in a big sales team. Lead gen, repeatable sales process, then sales team. Once you have that, invest aggressively in sales
  5. Growth has shown to have extremely high correlation with value created. This should be the key focus for software companies, especially smaller, younger ones
  6. You have to know your growth targets and what your growth levers are. What can you do to grow faster? Why not do that?
  7. Strategy
    1. Execution is king but will only go so far if the strategy is off. Make sure that your operating executives are also the head strategists for their units. The CEO must also be the chief strategist
    2. Hire drivers, not passengers. Get the wrong people off the bus
    3. Attack weakness, not strength
    4. Create a cost advantage or neutralize someone else’s
    5. It’s much easier to expand a market than create a new one
    6. Early adopters buy differently than late adopters. Aim for the early adopters first but then have to use those examples to lure in late adopters
    7. Stay close to home in the early going – more resources and attention can be given to local customers and get better and more frequent feedback
    8. Build the whole product or solve the whole problem as fast as you can
    9. Architecture is everything
    10. Prepare to transform your strategy sooner than you expect – as a leader, you need to operate well ahead of the current dynamic
  8. Build a strong culture – it matters more than you think
    1. It is the persistent actions, beliefs, behaviors of a group of people and sets the norms and standards
  9. Mentions Moore’s Crossing the Chasm often

What I got out of it

  1. Great, tactical advice on how to compress timelines and increase the velocity of your organization – a mindset as much as a process

In Pursuit of Elegance: Why the Best Ideas Have Something Missing by Matthew May

Summary

  1. Many of the most successful people, ideas, companies, products, etc. share a similar theme – elegance. Elegance is characterized by 4 key elements – symmetry, seduction, subtraction and sustainability. 

Key Takeaways

  1. Often the best and purest ideas are not great for what they are or what they have, but what they are not or do not have 
  2. Elegance – maximum impact with minimum input (simplicity)
  3. Symmetry, seduction, subtraction, sustainability are the key elements of elegance
  4. Power of suggestion is often stronger than that of full disclosure

What I got out of it

  1. Wonderful read and makes reminds you how “perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” – Saint Exupery

The Lion Tracker’s Guide to Life by Boyd Varty

Summary

  1. This is the story of how I found my track – my path in life – and how it might help you find yours

Key Takeaways

  1. We don’t need life coaches to find our purpose, we need to return inside us, return to instinct. By getting back in touch with our wild animal nature, we, in fact, become more human
  2. We will all fall asleep at some point in our lives. When we are ready to hear the call to wake up, we can take the first step. Simply by paying attention can you begin to wake up
  3. The archetype of the father is someone who helps you become the best version of yourself. This is often not the actual father or close male relative
  4. Learning to track is like learning a foreign language.
  5. Don’t try to be someone. Find something so engaging that it helps you forget yourself
  6. I don’t know where we’re going, but I know exactly how to get there
  7. You need to boil down the impossibly large area an animal can be in down to the first, single track. The journey to transformation is a series of first tracks
  8. Civilization is 3 days deep. After 3 days in the wilderness, you can shed modernity and get back to essence
  9. Losing the track is part of tracking. No movement or effort is wasted. If you lose the track, you know it’s not here. Go back to the last track, there is information there
  10. There is nothing more healing than finding your gift and sharing them

What I got out of it

  1. A beautifully written book – personal, vulnerable, deep. Seeing Boyd’s personal hero’s journey in action is inspiring and exciting

Impact Networks: Creating Connection, Sparking Collaboration, and Catalyzing Systemic Change by David Ehrlichman

Summary

  1. Networks are anything that connect people and organizations and Impact Networks bring individuals and organizations together for learning and collective action around a shared purpose

Key Takeaways

  1. People join a network to do something together that they can’t do alone
  2. People can solve simple issues, organizations the complicated, and networks are needed for complex issues
  3. David’s personal mission statement – to help catalyze others so they can make their greatest impact
  4. A robust way to grow in a networked world is through connections and collaboration rather than through size
  5. The essential role of network coordination – Network coordinators are the architects and builders of collaborative efforts. Those who perform these roles have been called systems leaders, systems entrepreneurs, network leaders, network entrepreneurs, strategic conveners, and accompagnateurs. Whatever they are called, their primary role is to coordinate a constellation of people, resources, and skills to achieve a shared vision and address complex challenges.
  6. The author describes how network leadership is more inclusive, diverse, and open than in an organisation, they work collaboratively using their strengths and understand they are part of a relationship web. Four distinct roles of network weavers are: connectors, project coordinators, network facilitators, and network guardians, which are outlined together with network functions.
  7. Finally the article outlines three needed changes for networks: power distribution, transparency – allowing work to move outwards to the edges -, and self-directed learning (personal knowledge mastery).
  8. Impact networks are intentional.
  9. Have to enable information into the network, out of the network, across the network
  10. Those who tap into the power of networks realize that everything is interconnected, relationship-based. They are eco-driven rather than ego-driven
  11. A big difference with networks is that leadership is fluid and context dependent rather than hierarchical.
  12. Networks can be learning focused (learning and connections), action (learning, network, and action), or impact (several action networks combined to chase a common goal)
  13. 5 C’s
    1. Clarify purpose and principles – principles operationalize vlues
    2. Convene the people
    3. Cultivate trust – trust + action is a powerful formula
    4. Connection
    5. Collaborate for systems change
  14. Network leaders help connect disparate people and groups to help them thrive. They don’t tell people what to do, just unlocks potential by connecting. They opt to connect and collaborate. 4 key jobs – catalyzing, facilitation, weaving (deepening relationships), coordination
    1. Foster self organization
    2. Promote emergence
    3. Embrace change
    4. Embrace dynamic change
  15. Work to make systems resilient through decentralized efforts and redundancy
  16. Make sure to focus on possibilities more than problems
  17. Help people achieve something they care about
    1. Connect members with similar interests
    2. Ask “why do you do what you do?”
  18. Network health has several key pillars – Network activity, Strength of connectivity, Participant experience – coherence and collaboration, shared purpose, relationships of trust

What I got out of it

  1. Great primer on setting up an impact network, progress it, and assess it. More tools found at converge.net. Putting the problem / question at the center and connecting any organizations that are trying to solve the same thing is a key differentiator – most companies put themselves at the center and then try to get others to tap into them…

The Energy Formula: Six Life Changing Ingredients to Unleash Your Limitless Potential by Shawn Wells

Summary

  1. In todays fast paced world, getting more energy is constantly top of mind. In this book, the author walks through 6 steps to build your resilience and get more energy

Key Takeaways

  1. Nutrition
    1. It’s not just what we eat, but how we eat
    2. Replace “diet” with “lifestyle.” Diet evokes restrictions and short term fixes where what we really need is a healthy lifestyle
    3. The author recommends a Neto diet, limiting carbs to <20g per day
  2. Exercise
    1. Quality > Quantity
    2. The ideal workout regiment has 2-3x/wk of resistance training, 2x/wk HIIT, 2x/wk aerobic workouts
    3. Simply exercising is not enough. You need to keep moving throughout the day and have us few sedentary sitting hours as possible
    4. Hot/cold exposure has incredible benefits. Contrasting hot and cold showers when you do 10 seconds hot for 20 seconds cold and always in the shower with cold is available and easy to do
    5. Creatine is a no brainer. 5 g per day from CretaPure
    6. 10-20 g of collagen per day is important for most
  3. Routines
    1. A morning and evening routine is vital. What gives you energy? What helps you start the day and end the day with intention? Meditate, exercise, go outside, spend time with family, journal. The important thing is that it’s authentic to you and driven by you and not some external force
  4. Growth
    1. As we age, we need to adjust our workouts and diet to keep strong and nimble.
    2. We must continuously grow or else we’ll fall behind and it’ll be nearly impossible to catch up
    3. Part of growth is giving back and helping others
  5. Finding your tribe
    1. Long term and healthy relationships are one of the most important variables In our happiness and longevity
  6. Finding your why
    1. Truly loving yourself
  7. Other
    1. Never buy supplements with proprietary blends
    2. Important markers to gauge mitochondrial health
      1. HSCRP at or below 3mg/L
      2. Hemoglobin A1C at or below 5.5%
      3. Oxidized LDL less than 2.3 mg/DL

What I got out of it

  1. I’ve spent a lot of time learning about these things, so there wasn’t much that was new to me, but if you’re just starting this health journey, this is a wonderful 80/20 primer

Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones by James Clear

Summary

  1. Good habits unlock potential and compound overtime to great result. The four phases of the habit include cue, craving, response and reward. Clear seeks to synthesize various bodies of work in order to create an actionable operating manual for how to improve your habits and, by result, your life.

Key Takeaways

  1. He starts the book out with the story of how he got slammed with a baseball bat in the face and how this ruined him physically for years. He was forced to relearn how to walk and this helped him develop discipline and consistency. He didn’t become a pro baseball player, but he did fulfill his potential
  2. A habit is a routine that is done frequently, often automatically. Changes that seem small and insignificant at first or compound over the years and make a world of difference. Habits are the compound interest of self improvement
  3. Focus on trajectory over results. You get what you repeat – your life is an accumulation of your lagging habits.
  4. Systems > Goals. You don’t rise to the level of your goals. You fall to the level of your systems
  5. True behavior change requires identity change
  6. When the habit levers are in the right place, creating healthy habits becomes effortless
    1. Cue – make it obvious
    2. Craving – make it attractive
    3. Response – make it easy
    4. Reward – make it satisfying
    5. The inversion of the 4 above can help you stop doing things too (make it non-obvious, make it unattractive, make it hard, make it painful)
  7. The process for behavior change always begins with awareness
  8. When implementing a new habit, say what you’re going to do when and where helps increase the likelihood you’ll do it. Another powerful process is habit stacking – using the habits you already have in place to cue new habits you want to form
  9. Motivation is overrated. Environment often matters more. Design your environment to be productive and have visual cues to trigger healthy habits. Do your best to design it to also avoid any negative temptations
    1. Proximity is powerful. One of the most powerful things you can do is join a group or culture that exhibits traits you want to emulate. We copy and seek approval of the close, the many, the successful
  10. If you want to master something, simply start. Repetition is better than a perfect plan. Quantity leads to quality. The right question is not “how long will it take to form a new habit?” but “how many will it take to form a new habit?”
  11. 2 minute rule – make new habits as easy as possible, they should take less than 2 minutes to start. Standardize before you optimize
  12. Make good choices as automatic as possible and unhealthy choices as difficult as possible. Here are some 1 time actions that have recurring benefits
    1. Nutrition and health – buy a water filter, use smaller plates, remove tv from bedroom, buy blackout curtains, buy a great mattress, buy great shoes, use a standing desk
    2. Productivity – unsubscribe from emails, turn off notifications, set phone to silent, delete games and social media apps,
    3. Happiness – get a pet, move to a friendly neighborhood,
    4. Finance – setup auto payments, delete recurring services you no longer use, ask service providers for lower prices, auto enroll in buying stocks every quarter and rebalancing,
  13. Habit tracking, habit contracts, and accountability partners are wonderful ways to start positive habits or stop unhealthy ones
  14. Make sure to take your interests and proclivities into account. What comes easy to you that is hard for others?
  15. One of the things that separates the greats is that they welcome the boredom. They’re willing to stick with it even when they’re not in the mood or want to do something else. The greatest threat to success is not failure, but boredom
  16. The downside of habits is when they become such an entrenched part of your identity that you can’t see beyond them

What I got out of it

  1.  Clear does an admirable job of making a relatively obscure concept of “habits” very pragmatic and actionable. He provides real and concrete examples and catchy 1-liners to help cement them in your mind.