Category Archives: Media

First Principles of Value Creation by Joe Plumeri

A beautiful read that is worth reading and re-reading. Joe was CEO of North America at Citi which was the best performing stock in the 1990s and now is a senior executive at KRR, having turned around Willis and First Data. In this 2019 talk he shares eight of his first principles of value creation

Plumeri’s 8 Principles

  1. Vision
    1. Where’s grandma’s house? Where as we going
    2. We all need a vision. Without one, people will make up their out
  2. Purpose
    1. Do you passionately care about the client and vision?
  3. Make a big deal out of everything
    1. Delegate authority but never responsibility
    2. Write notes to everyone and recognize people as often as possible
    3. Gerald Ford helping to get friend buried at Arlington made me cry
  4. Create a no doors culture
    1. Go “play in traffic” – go make things happen
  5. Create a performance-based culture
    1. Citi had a program where if you didn’t exercise the stock, then you got double the amount. That’s how Sandy Weill was able to keep everyone
    2. Gave stock wherever he worked and he always put shareholders first. Would never even visit a tourist attraction if he was traveling because it was the shareholders who had paid to get him there
    3. Ownership, team building, everybody on the same page
  6. Widen the value gap
    1. The value gap is what people or companies can do for themselves compared to what you can do for them. You always want to be expanding this gap
    2. Never be in a commodity business
    3. Are you competent or compelling?
    4. Price is an issue in the absence of value
  7. Your reach should exceed your grasp
    1. Always ask, “What else?”
  8. Surround yourself with people who want to do great things
    1. Viking effect of burning boats, getting everyone all-in

Chip Conley On Measuring What Makes Life Worthwhile

Chip Conley, founder of boutique hotel chain Joie de Vivre and now central to AirBnb, discusses how be should really be measuring success

Rodney Mullen On Getting Up Again

Rodney Mullen is one of the all-time skateboarding legends – having pioneered and invented many of the moves and tricks which are ubiquitous today. In the talk below he talks about how to go with your gut and not overanalyze situations.

Bryan Warnecke On Living With Cystic Fibrosis

The Psychology of Human Misjudgment – Charlie Munger

The Beautiful Game – Tribute to the San Antonio Spurs

Absolutely beautiful montage to Gregg Popovich and the San Antonio Spurs – teamwork, humility, sense of humor, ability to enjoy other’s success, work ethic, growth outside of basketball, complete trust, greatest success is found in building strong, lasting, trusting relationships

Learning a Language in 6 Months

Chris Lonsdale gives a good TED talk on how to learn languages quickly and below is my summary

 

5 principles of Rapid Language Acquisition

  1. Focus on language content that is relevant to you – information that helps survival, personal goals, business, etc.
  2. Use language as a tool to communicate
  3. When you first understand the message, you will unconsciously acquire the language
    1. Comprehension is key
  4. Physiological training (filters in brain to native languages, facial muscles must adapt to new sounds)
  5. Psycho-physiological state
    1. Will learn much better when happy, relaxed, curious
    2. Must learn to tolerate ambiguity
7 Actions to take for Rapid Language Acquisition
  1. Listen a lot – brain soaking
  2. Focus on getting the meaning FIRST (before you get the words)
    1. Body language, nonverbal cues
  3. Start Mixing
    1. Mix verbs, nouns, adverbs…incredible amounts of sentences can be made with few words
  4. Focus on the most common words
    1. Week 1 – use target language (what is this?…)
    2. Week 2 – pronouns, common verbs, adjectives (you, that, give, hot…)
    3. Week 3/4 – Glue words (although, but, therefore…)
  5. Get a Language Parent – creates a safe environment to practice
    1. Works to understand what you are saying
    2. Does not correct mistake
    3. Confirms understanding by using correct language
    4. Uses words the learner knows
  6. Copy the facial movements
  7. Direct Connect” to mental images
    1. Don’t convert from mother tongue to new language, use memories and imagery to connect new path

How to Learn but not Master Languages

Summary of Tim Ferriss’ suggestions for quickly deconstructing and learning any language (more detailed information on Tim’s site found here)

  1. Deconstruct the language –
    • Are there new grammatical structures which will postpone fluency?
    • Are there new sounds that will double or quadruple time to fluency?
    • Is it similar to languages I already know?
    • How difficult will it be and how long would it take to become functionally fluent?
  2. Translate these sentences to gain a simple understanding of how verbs are conjugated, fundamental sentence structure and will expose noun cases
    • The apple is red
    • It is John’s apple
    • I give John the apple
    • We give him the apple
    • He gives it to John
    • She gives it to him
    • I must give it to him
    • I want to give it to her
    • Is the apple red?
    • The apples are red
    • I’m going to know tomorrow
    • I can’t eat the apple
  3. Understand the different sounds of the new language and get examples of each exception. Also, try to get phoentic spellings in your native language if possible
  4. After these steps, you will better be able to determine if the target language is worth your investment and then you can put in more focused training

The Psyche on Automatic by Amy Cuddy

Warmth and competence. That is what social psychologist Amy Cuddy says we use  in our automatic judgments of others and allows us to group people into one of four categories:

Capture

 

Cuddy also discusses nonverbal cues and indicates that we feel very weary of others when their verbal and nonverbal cues aren’t synchronized.

Cuddy delivers a very interesting TED talk in which she says that just a couple minutes of a “power pose” can raise our testosterone and lower our cortisol levels. These open and expansive postures indicate dominance and competence and lower our stress levels. There is a back and forth interaction where our perceived dominance affects our hormones but our hormones also affect our perceived dominance. If an alpha is somehow removed, within days the next highest alpha will undergo these hormonal changes.

She finishes with the following advice, “…it’s rarely a good idea to strive to show everyone that you’re the smartest guy in the room: that person tends to be less creative, and less cognitively open to other ideas and people…the goal should be connecting. When people give a speech or lead a meeting…they tend to exaggerate the importance of words. They care too much about content and delivering it with precision. That makes them sound scripted. It is much better to come into a room, be trusting, connect with the audience wherever they are, and then move them with you.”

This article is well worth the read if you’re at all interested in how to become more confident, how to better utilize verbal and nonverbal cues to indicate competence and warmth, understand how and why others instinctively judge you and how to avoid incorrectly grouping and stereotyping people.

Derek Redmon – Barcelona Olympics 1992

Music might be a little over the top but the lesson is not. Imagine training your whole life for this event, for this minute and you get injured. How would you react?